ICRS13 proceedings

by Austin Yeung 2016-12-30

The proceedings of ICRS13, the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium, held in June 2016 at the Honolulu Convention Center, has now been published.

To learn more, click here to go to the ICRS13 proceedings page or download its table of contents here.

My paper with Prof. David M. Baker:

Session 80: A.H. Yeung, D.M. Baker (2016) A turnaround at Sanya National Coral Reef Nature Reserve?

Proc 13th Intl Coral Reef Symposium Honolulu: 561-580

can also be downloaded here.

Expedition to Palau

by Austin Yeung 2016-07-26

Six months and a few hundred diving photos later, I returned to Palau. This time, the purpose of travel was entirely different. Instead of vacationing in Palau, I was doing field work – coral experiments.  Marine biologist Prof. Palumbi and Megan Morikawa from Stanford University were doing baseline data collection in Palau. Amazingly, I was fortunate enough to be able to join them on this research expedition. Along with my friend Sebastian, another avid diver and photographer, I was introduced to sample and data collection in the ocean. By using data loggers, we recorded temperatures of the patch reefs in the area. A critical aspect of the experiment was to navigate the seas and find the locations at which the data loggers were first placed. I found this to be a very valuable learning experience as I was taught how to use a satellite GPS and use it to navigate the waters. It was fun, it was relaxing, and it was educational.

As you can imagine, doing research work in an environment like that of Palau, it’s hard not to become distracted by the beauty of the environment. With our underwater cameras, Sebastian and I were able to capture breathtaking photos of underwater life. On one particular occasion, Prof. Palumbi discovered a lionrock: a rock that sheltered lionfish. By using still shots with the GoPro, I was able to record the movements of a spectacular baby lionfish and its two parents. It’s the little things that we saw during our research expedition that really attracts me to this particular type of research. It’s the combination of seeing wildlife beauty and the research work around it that interests me. This is why I enjoy marine biology.

Summer internship at HKU

by Austin Yeung 2016-07-17

I am back to Hong Kong working as a summer intern with Prof. Dave Baker at the University of Hong Kong. This year, I got to work with Vicky and others in a number of projects within the new Baker Lab on the HKU main campus. Vicky taught me some basic forensic lab skills where I am learning how to extract DNA. I also met Ashley, another intern working at HKU this summer, in which we both experimented with the 3D scanner and became mini ‘experts’ on it.

It has been a great deal of fun and learning.

An internship at SWIMS

My summer internship at SWIMS

Austin at SWIMS 2015by Austin Yeung 2015-08-13

Just had an exciting ‘two-week’ summer internship at The Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS) in Hong Kong.  Many thanks to Prof. Baker for allowing me to be in his lab – which is really ‘everywhere’ — from the work bench within SWIMS at Cape D’Aguilar, where I got to work with Phil to quantify photo effects on coral/algae symbiosis, to ‘sitting in’ on department seminars with the folks from the Baker Lab on the HKU main campus, to ‘exploring and snorkeling’ Lantau and Nine Pins Islands, where Nico led us in surveying and collecting coral specimens for “paleoecological studies.”

Exciting projects and truly fun and smart people!  I learned a lot.

pH, nitrate and phosphate levels in Hong Kong Waters

by Austin Yeung 2015-08-09

Recently, with the help of my father, I collected water samples from Kaneoke Bay, Hawaii and various parts of Hong Kong.  My goal is to compare the pH, nitrate and phosphate levels of these sea water samples, using aquarium-type test agents purchased from the aquarium store in Hong Kong.

The results are interesting.  The Shek O sample has highest pH whereas the Kaneohe Bay sample has medium pH and the Gold Coast sample has the lowest pH value. For phosphate, the Kaneohe Bay sample has the lowest reading, whereas the Gold Coast sample again has the highest.